Apr 25, 2007

Statistics: How long does it take to create e-learning?

I'm often asked for development ratio's and other statistics on e-learning development. A characteristics of e-learning is that is requires more time and money upfront to develop the course as compared to more traditional approaches. Some people don't realise that so it is good to set the expectations right from the beginning.
The text and table below come from a free Brandon Hall research paper 'e-learning 101' that I wrote about in a previous post. You'll find industry-average numbers that should give you a rough idea.
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How Long Does it Take to Create E-Learning?
There are no set measurements on how long it takes to create e-learning. It depends on the content, resources available, level of interactivity, and capabilities of the developer. One source says creating a one-hour e-learning course averages about 250 hours of development time.
Acceptable production times are approximately 8-12 weeks for one hour of training, 12-16 weeks for two hours of training, and 16-20 weeks for three hours of training (Codone, p.14). This is consistent with this author’s experience on an interactive course utilizing a team of people. Bryan Chapman, chief learning strategist and consultant/researcher through alliance with Brandon Hall Research, provides the following benchmarks

Ratio

Type of learning

34:1

Instructor-led training (ILT), including design, lesson plans, handouts, PowerPoint slides, etc.

33:1

PowerPoint to e-learning conversion. Not sure why it takes less time then creating ILT, but that’s what we discovered when surveying 200 companies about this practice.

220:1

Standard e-learning, which includes presentation, audio, some video, test questions,and 20 percent interactivity

345:1

Time it takes for online learning publishers to design, create, test, and package thirdparty courseware

750:1

Simulations from scratch. Creating highly interactive content.

1 comment:

Franchesca said...

Try iSpring products for PowerPoint to e-learning conversion. It saves most of the animation effects, embeds sounds and videos and also has a player that has lots of useful functions.